“Let's follow Paul Williams around the country.”



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 908 posts ]  Go to page 1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ... 42  ( Previous  |  Next )
Author Message
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:43 am 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Found this on usenet, can't vouch for the accuracy................

http://torrentfreak.com/major-usenet-pr ... er-111106/
---
News-Service.com, one of the leading Usenet providers with many prominent
resellers, has terminated its services with immediate effect. The shutdown
is the direct and unavoidable outcome of a two-year battle with Dutch
anti-piracy outfit BREIN, which was eventually decided against the Usenet
provider. News-Service announced that it will appeal the decision “out of
principle” as it threatens the entire 30-year-old Usenet community.

Two years ago BREIN, representing the movie and music industries, took
News-Service.com (NSE) to court.

Although the name NSE might not ring a bell with many people, it is the
largest usenet provider in Europe and has many high-profile resellers such
as Usenext.

Through the court BREIN demanded that the NSE delete all infringing content
from its servers, and six weeks ago the Court of Amsterdam sided with the
copyright holders.

In an attempt to keep their service operational, NSE asked the Court to put
the execution of the verdict on hold while the Usenet provider appealed its
case, but this week that request was denied. As a result NSE was forced to
shut down its services.

“This means that we are forced to cease our operations with immediate
effect,” NSE said in a statement.

Despite the setback the Usenet provider will persist with its appeal, not
least because the landmark verdict could have disastrous consequences for
other Usenet providers.

“For reasons of principle, News-Service.com will not accept the verdict and
has lodged an appeal,” NSE announced.

The verdict of the Amsterdam Court is very similar to the one that decimated
BitTorrent site Mininova two years ago. It requires NSE to finding a way to
identify and delete all copyrighted files from its servers, which is
practically impossible.

Aside from threatening many other Usenet providers, a similar judgement
would also mean the end of file-hosting sites such as Megaupload, and other
cloud storage services including Dropbox. All these services remove
copyrighted files when they are asked to, but policing their own servers
proactively may prove to be impossible.

BREIN is nevertheless delighted with the verdict of the court. “It is a
breakthrough step to further dismantle the availability of illegal content
on Usenet,” director Tim Kuik said previously.

It wouldn’t be a surprise if BREIN now waves this verdict in the face of
other Usenet providers, in the hope of shutting them down. Using this same
tactic BREIN has already managed to pull hundreds of (small) torrent sites
offline in the Netherlands.

TorrentFreak contacted NSE to ask what the decision means for their
resellers and whether they have plans to “go abroad” in some shape or form.
We will update this article when a response comes in.

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:03 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Searching for stolen content, Warner steals from Hotfile

Entertainment company Warner Bros. is defending its anti piracy efforts following allegations of abuse, including removing content that it did not own the copyrights to. The claims raise serious questions as to whether current anti-piracy efforts making its way through Congress may punish innocent parties if this is a common occurrence.

File hosting service Hotfile sued Warner in September, claiming that after granting server access to Warner to remove copyrighted content, the media giant not only removed its own but also content it owned no rights to.

Hotfile alerted Warner to the issues, but the movie studio ignored those complaints. Running out of options, Hotfile sued Warner for fraud and abuse.

The real rub comes in Warner's own description of its practices, which can be found in a filing with the US District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Warner admits that it took down files that it didn't own the copyrights to, and typically searched for files on keywords alone.

Worse yet, Warner instructs employees to take down software that enables faster download of pirated content. These files are open-source, so no one owns those rights.

The courts must now decide if Warner is within its rights, although any legal observer should expect the judge to ban Warner from removing files other than its own: the law doesn't allow for vigilante copyright protection.

That said, everyone should worry if these methods are widespread in the industry.

Two companion bills are snaking through Congress, the PROTECT-IP Act in the Senate, and the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the House. Critics have lambasted both bills for what they see as blatant censorship.

Why? In SOPA the legislation would create a legal basis for the Attorney General to cut off websites from the Internet, even without notice. With that in mind, think of the story of Hotfile and Warner. What if an entertainment company like Warner mistakenly claimed pirated files on a company's web server?

That website could lose Internet access -- no questions asked. In some cases, it gives the power to the corporations themselves to ask for blacklisting, which could strip the websites of their legal right to be innocent before proven guilty.

In the bill's defense, that only appears to be for payment processing, but nevertheless the website could be stripped of its revenue stream for days while fighting to prove its innocence.

"The potential for rampant abuse is obvious: whether it’s a frivolous claim that wouldn’t withstand the scrutiny of the official process or an attempt to put an emerging competitor at an extreme disadvantage", Electronic Frontier Federation activist Trevor Timm says.

Warner and Hotfile's saga should serve as a wakeup call to those in Congress pushing for the current forms of these bills.

It is clear that an industry's overzealous effort to curb piracy has gone too far and is negatively impacting a business as a result. Washington's effort could add a whole new dimension to that, especially considering Warner's alleged carelessness.

http://betanews.com/2011/11/10/searchin ... m-hotfile/

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:09 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Studios take Newzbin2 clampdown to big ISPs

The Motion Picture Association has begun the process of forcing the UK's big ISPs to block the Newzbin2 file-sharing site.

Virgin Media and TalkTalk received letters on Monday from the MPA, which said the film industry body plans to seek a court order to obtain the block. The letters also asked whether the ISPs planned to contest the order, the companies told ZDNet UK.

"[The MPA] is now coming after all the big other ISPs and asking them to do the same thing [as BT]," TalkTalk's regulatory chief Andrew Heaney said on Tuesday.

The MPA won a court order in July forcing BT to block retail customer access to Newzbin2, a Usenet site that helps people unlawfully share copyrighted material. The movie studio group made it clear at the time that it would at some point seek a similar block from other major ISPs.

In late October, the court gave BT two weeks to start blocking Newzbin2. BT began filtering traffic days later, using the Cleanfeed technology it had previously installed to prevent access to child pornography sites.

Virgin Media said it would block Newzbin2 if told to do so by a judge.

"As a responsible ISP, we will comply with any court order addressed to us but strongly believe such deterrents need to be accompanied by compelling legal alternatives, such as our agreement with Spotify, which give consumers access to content at the right price," a Virgin Media spokeswoman said.

The MPA confirmed that it had sent the letters. They referred to "the recent order by Mr Justice Arnold and asked the major UK ISPs whether they would consent to a court order requiring them to impede subscriber access to the Newzbin2 website," a spokesman for film studio group said.

The BT case was a second shot for the rights-holders, as a suit against the original Newzbin site succeeded only in shutting down its UK operations. In the interim, the proprietors simply moved their hosting to the Seychelles and mildly altered the name of the service, making an ISP-level block the only way of inhibiting access for UK web users.

Justice Arnold's Newzbin2 judgement was followed by a letter to BT from the MPA, the BPI and various other content industry bodies. The letter asked BT to extend the block to The Pirate Bay, a Swedish BitTorrent tracker that is also sometimes used for copyright infringement.

However, BT told the rights-holders that they would have to get another court order, as it would not institute any such block without a judge's say-so.

TalkTalk's Heaney said that ISP would take a similar stance, if it received a similar request.

The court order against BT calls only for BT Retail customers to be blocked from visiting the Newzbin2 site, and smaller ISPs that resell BT's wholesale connectivity are not subject to its terms. This means that, if the rights industry were to concentrate only on the big ISPs for reasons of practicality, customers wishing to circumvent the block could simply move to a small provider to do so.

"At this stage, we don't rule out any options," the MPA's spokesman said. "Our goal continues to be secure greater cooperation from all internet service providers in tackling pirate sites that are focused on wholesale copyright infringement and making significant money in the process."

The MPA will focus its efforts on only "the most harmful sites", he added.

Apart from changing ISPs, people may be able to circumvent BT's filtering of Newzbin2 using VPNs, proxies or the encrypted client that Newzbin2 released shortly after the UK court's judgement.

http://www.zdnet.co.uk/news/intellectua ... -40094381/

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2011 1:25 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Linda wrote:
Quote:
Searching for stolen content, Warner steals from Hotfile

Entertainment company Warner Bros. is defending its anti piracy efforts following allegations of abuse, including removing content that it did not own the copyrights to. The claims raise serious questions as to whether current anti-piracy efforts making its way through Congress may punish innocent parties if this is a common occurrence.

File hosting service Hotfile sued Warner in September, claiming that after granting server access to Warner to remove copyrighted content, the media giant not only removed its own but also content it owned no rights to.

Hotfile alerted Warner to the issues, but the movie studio ignored those complaints. Running out of options, Hotfile sued Warner for fraud and abuse.

The real rub comes in Warner's own description of its practices, which can be found in a filing with the US District Court for the Southern District of Florida. Warner admits that it took down files that it didn't own the copyrights to, and typically searched for files on keywords alone.

Worse yet, Warner instructs employees to take down software that enables faster download of pirated content. These files are open-source, so no one owns those rights.

The courts must now decide if Warner is within its rights, although any legal observer should expect the judge to ban Warner from removing files other than its own: the law doesn't allow for vigilante copyright protection.

That said, everyone should worry if these methods are widespread in the industry.

Two companion bills are snaking through Congress, the PROTECT-IP Act in the Senate, and the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) in the House. Critics have lambasted both bills for what they see as blatant censorship.

Why? In SOPA the legislation would create a legal basis for the Attorney General to cut off websites from the Internet, even without notice. With that in mind, think of the story of Hotfile and Warner. What if an entertainment company like Warner mistakenly claimed pirated files on a company's web server?

That website could lose Internet access -- no questions asked. In some cases, it gives the power to the corporations themselves to ask for blacklisting, which could strip the websites of their legal right to be innocent before proven guilty.

In the bill's defense, that only appears to be for payment processing, but nevertheless the website could be stripped of its revenue stream for days while fighting to prove its innocence.

"The potential for rampant abuse is obvious: whether it’s a frivolous claim that wouldn’t withstand the scrutiny of the official process or an attempt to put an emerging competitor at an extreme disadvantage", Electronic Frontier Federation activist Trevor Timm says.

Warner and Hotfile's saga should serve as a wakeup call to those in Congress pushing for the current forms of these bills.

It is clear that an industry's overzealous effort to curb piracy has gone too far and is negatively impacting a business as a result. Washington's effort could add a whole new dimension to that, especially considering Warner's alleged carelessness.

http://betanews.com/2011/11/10/searchin ... m-hotfile/


The USA: the next China.

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 8:02 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Geist: Internet belongs to us, U.S. argues

The U.S. Congress is currently embroiled in a heated debated over the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), proposed legislation that supporters argue is needed to combat online infringement, but critics fear would create the “great firewall of the United States.”

SOPA’s potential impact on the Internet and development of online services is enormous as it cuts across the lifeblood of the Internet and e-commerce in the effort to target websites that are characterized as being “dedicated to the theft of U.S. property.” This represents a new standard that many experts believe could capture hundreds of legitimate websites and services.

For those caught by the definition, the law envisions requiring Internet providers to block access to the sites, search engines to remove links from search results, payment intermediaries such as credit card companies and Paypal to cut off financial support, and Internet advertising companies to cease placing advertisements.

While these measures have unsurprisingly raised concern among Internet companies and civil society groups, the jurisdictional implications demand far more attention. The U.S. approach is breathtakingly broad, effectively treating millions of websites and IP addresses as “domestic” for U.S. law purposes.

The long arm of U.S. law manifests itself in at least five ways in the proposed legislation.

First, it defines a “domestic domain name” as a domain name “that is registered or assigned by a domain name registrar, domain name registry, or other domain name registration authority, that is located within a judicial district of the United States.” Since every dot-com, dot-net and dot-org domain is managed by a domain name registry in the U.S., the law effectively asserts jurisdiction over tens of millions of domain names regardless of where the registrant actually resides.

Second, it defines “domestic Internet protocol addresses” — the numeric strings that constitute the actual address of a website or Internet connection — as “an Internet Protocol address for which the corresponding Internet Protocol allocation entity is located within a judicial district of the United States.”

Yet IP addresses are allocated by regional organizations, not national ones. The allocation entity located in the U.S. is called ARIN, the Americas Registry for Internet Numbers. Its territory includes the U.S., Canada, and 20 Caribbean nations. This bill treats all IP addresses in this region as domestic for U.S. law purposes.

To put this is context, every Canadian Internet provider relies on ARIN for its block of IP addresses. In fact, ARIN even allocates the block of IP addresses used by federal and provincial governments. The U.S. bill would treat them all as domestic for U.S. law purposes.

Third, the bill grants the U.S. “in rem” jurisdiction over any website that does not have a domestic jurisdictional connection. For those sites, the U.S. grants jurisdiction over the property of the site and opens the door to court orders requiring Internet providers to block the site and Internet search engines to stop linking to it.

Should a website owner wish to challenge the court order, U.S. law asserts itself in a fourth way, since in order for an owner to file a challenge (described as a “counter notification”), the owner must first consent to the jurisdiction of the U.S. courts.

If these measures were not enough, the fifth measure makes it a matter of U.S. law to ensure that intellectual property protection is a significant component of U.S. foreign policy and grants more resources to U.S. embassies around the world to increase their involvement in foreign legal reform.

U.S. intellectual property lobbying around the world has been well documented with new Canadian copyright legislation widely viewed as a direct consequence of years of political pressure. The new U.S. proposal takes this aggressive approach to another level by simply asserting jurisdiction over millions of Canadian registered IP addresses and domain names.

http://www.thestar.com/article/1085475- ... u-s-argues

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2011 8:17 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Quote:
For those caught by the definition, the law envisions requiring Internet providers to block access to the sites, search engines to remove links from search results, payment intermediaries such as credit card companies and Paypal to cut off financial support, and Internet advertising companies to cease placing advertisements.

Amazing how I've been suggesting this solution to spammers for years, but since the banks make a fortune on spam, it will never be used in the one area it's appropriate.

Obama = Bush light. Change my ass.

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Nov 18, 2011 5:41 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
SANS wrote:
--House Committee Hears SOPA Debate
(November 16, 2011)
In a hearing before the US House Judiciary Committee, legislators and
half a dozen witnesses debated the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) that
would, if passed in its current form, give the Justice Department the
authority to order US Internet service providers (ISPs) to prevent users
from accessing sites that are on a blacklist for copyright violations.
The Justice Department would also have the authority to order search
engines to remove rogue sites from search results. Representative Lamar
Smith (R-Texas), one of the bill's chief sponsors, has admitted that
he's "not a technical expert on this." A similar piece of legislation,
the Protect IP Act, is stalled in the US Senate. The Electronic Frontier
Foundation (EFF) has called SOPA "the most extreme, anti-Internet,
anti-privacy, anti-free speech copyright proposal in US legislative
history." Experts say the plan would break DNSSEC.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/1 ... ting-bill/

http://redtape.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011 ... egislation

http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Security/Secur ... ns-495532/
[Editor's Note (Murray): Regardless of how much money the publishers
pump into Congress, anti-piracy cannot be permitted to trump all other
values. Opponents of the bill are beginning to gain some traction but
they have complained that hearings were stacked against them.
(Liston): Once again, we're faced with an issue where the intent of the
legislation (prevention of online criminal activity) is laudable, but
the way that the legislation is written will actually cause more harm
than good (for example, the blacklisting provisions are too draconian
and don't provide targets with due process or sufficient means of
appeal). What is particularly appalling is that legislators recognize
that they don't sufficiently understand the technical ramifications of
this bill but are content to press forward with the process anyway.]

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 2:11 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Universal to sue online music site Grooveshark for copyright infringement

Universal have filed a lawsuit against online music streaming service Grooveshark, according to reports.

The record company - which is home to the likes of Klaxons and Jessie J - are claiming that Grooveshark, which allows users to search, stream and upload music, have uploaded more than 100,000 songs illicitly to their site.

According to CNET, Universal have obtained e-mails and other records proving that Grooveshark employees posted pirated songs on their service and are seeking maximum statutory damages of up to $150,000 (£95,000) per infringement.

Previously, Grooveshark has claimed that they are not liable for copyright violations committed by their users due to the protection provided by the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, but the same protocols do not apply to service providers for acts of infringement.

Grooveshark's vice president of external affairs Paul Geller said that the company had yet to see the legal and complaint, and would not be commenting on the dispute.

Last week, it was reported that Universal Music had agreed a deal to purchase the recorded music division of EMI for £1.2 billion. Artists on EMI include the likes of The Beatles, Coldplay and Tinie Tempah.

Universal, meanwhile, are being sued by Public Enemy's Chuck D after he alleged that they had underpaid him his royalties for digital downloads, although a UMG spokesperson described the rapper's complaint as suffering from "serious flaws and weaknesses".

http://www.nme.com/news/various-artists/60499

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:23 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Who the F is "Klaxons and Jessie J"?

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:48 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Senate Votes Down Opposition to Net Neutrality
(November 10, 2011)
In a 52-46 party-line vote, the US Senate has rejected a resolution that
would have overturned the Federal Communications Commission's net
neutrality rules. President Obama had said he would veto the resolution
if it passed. The FCC's net neutrality rules are still facing challenges
through lawsuits filed by telecommunications companies.
http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news ... lution.ars
http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/technol ... vote-.html
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/1 ... eutrality/
[Editor's Note (Murray): The FCC rule surrendered to AT&T and Verizon
on the air side, where it matters, in return for rules on the wired side
where it doesn't. What am I missing?
(Paller): The answer to Bill's question may be that AT&T and Verizon
lobbyists, along with those of a few other lobbyists representing IT
companies, are now approaching Enron's lobbyists in power to shape
federal actions and in disregard for the public good.]

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:50 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Warner Brothers Admits Issuing Over-Broad Takedown Orders
(November 9, 2011)
Warner Brothers has admitted that it used an automated takedown tool to
request the removal of files from the Internet that were obviously not
infringing on the company's copyrights. The case involved Hotfile, a
locker site that maintains it is in compliance with the Digital
Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) because it follows the rules about
notice and takedown procedures. In fact, Hotfile provided Warner
Brothers with a takedown tool to facilitate the process. Hotfile is now
arguing that Warner Brothers violated DMCA when it ordered the takedown
of files that were clearly not infringing copyright. The data used in
those takedowns appeared to come from an automated data scraper rather
than a human being's examination. Warner Brothers says it cannot
possibly examine all suspect files due to their sheer volume, but the
DMCA requires that copyright holders issue takedown notices only when
there is a "good faith belief that the use of the material in the manner
complained of is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or
the law."

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news ... ked-at.ars
[Editor's Note (Liston): Warner Bros' assertion that it "cannot possibly
examine all files" is more than a bit disingenuous: what they're really
saying is that they don't want to incur the costs associated with
examining the files. Media companies are all about enjoying the
monetary benefit of their copyrights, but are constantly looking for
ways to foist the cost of protecting those copyrights off onto someone
else.]

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 9:48 pm 
User avatar
Super Genius

Joined: 20 Sep 2006
Posts: 6893
Geff R. wrote:
Sans wrote:
Warner Brothers says it cannot
possibly examine all suspect files due to their sheer volume
, but the
DMCA requires that copyright holders issue takedown notices only when
there is a "good faith belief that the use of the material in the manner
complained of is not authorized by the copyright owner, its agent, or
the law."

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news ... ked-at.ars
[Editor's Note (Liston): Warner Bros' assertion that it "cannot possibly
examine all files" is more than a bit disingenuous: what they're really
saying is that they don't want to incur the costs associated with
examining the files. Media companies are all about enjoying the
monetary benefit of their copyrights, but are constantly looking for
ways to foist the cost of protecting those copyrights off onto someone
else.]


Wait a sec - isn't this the same argument ISPs and web sites made and the labels pooh-poohed? The RIAA wanted sites to examine every file to remove the infringing files instead of having to name the infringing files themselves (they used this with YouTube as well, IIRC). Now that they have to do it, it's too hard and too expensive?

Excuse me - got a river to cry...

Alan

_________________
Alan

"Keepin' it classy, all the way to Christmas!" - Craig Ferguson


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 3:47 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Universal's lawsuit against Grooveshark could be worth over $17 billion

Universal's lawsuit against Grooveshark could cost the online music streaming service up to $17 billion (£10.9 billion) if it succeeds.

The record company, which is home to the likes of Klaxons and Jessie J, has filed a lawsuit which claims that Grooveshark, which allows users to search, stream and upload music, has uploaded more than 113,000 songs illicitly to their site and are reported to want $150,000 (£96,000) in compensation for each track.

According to initial reports, Universal took the decision to sue after they obtained emails and other records proving that Grooveshark employees posted pirated songs on their service and are seeking damages for each infringement.

Grooveshark attorney Marshall Custer has issued a statement to Digital Music News which rejects the suit's claim and says that the record company's case is wholly reliant on "an anonymous, blatantly false internet blog comment". The statement also accuses the record company of a "gross mischaracterization of information that Grooveshark itself provided to Universal".

Custer's statement reads: "We have reviewed the complaint that Universal Music Group filed last Friday against Grooveshark in the US District Court in Manhattan. Universal’s claims rest almost entirely on an anonymous, blatantly false internet blog comment and Universal's gross mischaracterization of information that Grooveshark itself provided to Universal."

It continues: "While Universal has deliberately engaged the media prior to serving a copy of the complaint on Grooveshark, Grooveshark intends to fight this battle before the Court, not in the press. Grooveshark welcomes the opportunity to present the facts to the Court and has full confidence that it will prevail in the litigation."

No court date has been set for the lawsuit as yet.

Universal Music recently agreed a deal to purchase the recorded music division of EMI for £1.2 billion. Artists on EMI include the likes of The Beatles, Coldplay and Tinie Tempah.

http://www.nme.com/news/various-artists/60579

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 7:45 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Uncensored web is a fundamental right, EU says

The European Court of Justice has overthrown a ruling that would force ISPs to filter their internet traffic to prevent illegal file sharing, Ars Technica reports. Scarlet Extended, a major Belgian ISP, has been the target of a suit by the Belgian Society of Authors, Composers and Publishers over alleged piracy by the ISP's customers.

It took a while to get things sorted out - the suit began in 2004, and a 2007 ruling required Scarlet to sniff out and filter illegal content. Scarlet appealed since, according to them, monitoring users' communications would've been in violation of European law. All of that equipment would've been expensive, too. So Scarlet decided to take the suit all the way to the highest court in the land.

When Scarlet asked the European Court of Justice whether local courts had the right to force them to censor their internet traffic, the answer was a resounding no. The court found that the law would infringe on users' right "to protection of their personal data and their right to receive or impart information," and that monitoring internet traffic could "potentially undermine freedom of information since that system might not distinguish adequately between unlawful content and lawful content, with the result that its introduction could lead to the blocking of lawful communications..."

It's also still legal for copyright holders to request that an ISP block a particular infringing site, but they will be protected from being required to enforce wider filtering. On the other hand, the ruling effectively shot down the possibility of anything like the Stop Online Piracy Act that copyright holders have been trying to force through Congress in the United States from being instituted in the EU.

It's good to finally see courts standing up against such heavy handed tactics. Rights holder's quest to block pirated content has the unfortunate side effect of cutting off access to legally shared content and services, as well as creating legal precedents inviting wider censorship. Now, if we can just get US courts to do the same...

http://www.neowin.net/news/uncensored-w ... ht-eu-says

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 8:51 pm 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Report: US government seizes over 130 web domains

A few days before the launch of Cyber Monday, the US government is reportedly cracking down on a number of web sites that have been labeled to be selling pirated software or counterfeited merchandise. Torrentfreak.com reports that over the last day or so it has found that over 130 web sites have been taken over by the government. So far there's been no official word from any government agencies about these actions, although it's possible that they are waiting until Cyber Monday to make the official announcement.

The article lists the web sites that have been taken over, and most of them appear to charge people to use their businesses. From the list, it looks like the vast majority of the web sites had online store fronts that sold counterfeit sports apparel items. One of the sites, autocd.com, did apparently sell pirated software items.

The article points out that the federal government took control of over 82 web sites under similar conditions nearly one year ago including some web sites that distributed free music and movie downloads and a web site devoted to finding torrent-based files. The government, including the Department of Justice, called the efforts "Operation In Our Sites." However it doesn't appear that software download sites were the targets of this latest operation.

http://www.neowin.net/news/report-us-go ... eb-domains

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 9:25 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Linda wrote:
Quote:
Uncensored web is a fundamental right, EU says

The European Court of Justice has overthrown a ruling that would force ISPs to filter their internet traffic to prevent illegal file sharing, Ars Technica reports. Scarlet Extended, a major Belgian ISP, has been the target of a suit by the Belgian Society of Authors, Composers and Publishers over alleged piracy by the ISP's customers.

It took a while to get things sorted out - the suit began in 2004, and a 2007 ruling required Scarlet to sniff out and filter illegal content. Scarlet appealed since, according to them, monitoring users' communications would've been in violation of European law. All of that equipment would've been expensive, too. So Scarlet decided to take the suit all the way to the highest court in the land.

When Scarlet asked the European Court of Justice whether local courts had the right to force them to censor their internet traffic, the answer was a resounding no. The court found that the law would infringe on users' right "to protection of their personal data and their right to receive or impart information," and that monitoring internet traffic could "potentially undermine freedom of information since that system might not distinguish adequately between unlawful content and lawful content, with the result that its introduction could lead to the blocking of lawful communications..."

It's also still legal for copyright holders to request that an ISP block a particular infringing site, but they will be protected from being required to enforce wider filtering. On the other hand, the ruling effectively shot down the possibility of anything like the Stop Online Piracy Act that copyright holders have been trying to force through Congress in the United States from being instituted in the EU.

It's good to finally see courts standing up against such heavy handed tactics. Rights holder's quest to block pirated content has the unfortunate side effect of cutting off access to legally shared content and services, as well as creating legal precedents inviting wider censorship. Now, if we can just get US courts to do the same...

http://www.neowin.net/news/uncensored-w ... ht-eu-says


This is great news, EXCEPT the bullying USA is going to tell these countries, "comply or else". The Euro pols will than find a way to overrule their own court system to please us good ol' USA cowboys.

Can you tell I'm fed up with our gvt, & I mean BOTH parties??!

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 

IMWAN Admin
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 4:39 am 
User avatar
Helpful Librarian

Joined: 13 Jan 1966
Posts: 101849
Location: IMWAN Towers
Bannings: If you're not nice
Quote:
Anti-piracy group BREIN caught ripping off music

Oh let the laughter ensue raucously on this one folks.

Seriously how ridiculously stupid do you have to be to not only steal music from the very people you are suppose to be representing, and protecting, but then to get caught doing it.

It all started back in 2006 when Dutch performer Melchior Rietveldt was approached by the anti-piracy group BREIN to write a score for an anti-piracy video which he was led to believe would only be shown a a local arts festival.

Well it turns out that his music found its way on a large number of retail DVD’s as the background music for the anti-piracy lead in to the movie. Rietveldt only discovered this because he heard it playing on the Harry Potter DVD he was watching. Now according to some numbers being floated around his music could very well have ended up onto tens of millions of discs.

It was Rietveldt’s financial advisory who informed him that had he been properly paid for the additional use of his work he would have seen a payday of around one million Euros.

Now this is where insult gets added onto injury because when Rietveldt tried to contact the local group responsible for collecting these types of royalties he was ignored. It wasn’t until he was contacted by the local BREIN representative Jochem Gerrits with a proposition. or rather what amounted to a shakedown.

You see Gerrits, who also owns a record label, offered to intercede on Rietveldt’s behalf to get his money if Rietveldt agreed to pay Gerrits 33% of whatever was retrieved. Apparently the reasoning behind this arrangement as Gerrits told Rietveldt’s financial advisor was that without his help Rietveldt wouldn’t see a dime so he deserved a cut for his help.

And the music industry wonders why people don’t trust them further than they can spit in a headwind.

http://www.inquisitr.com/164675/anti-pi ... off-music/

_________________
Image


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sat Dec 03, 2011 8:26 am 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
:sigh: This sort if thing is why I swing far left politically.

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Sun Dec 04, 2011 10:32 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Business Software Alliance CEO Says SOPA Goes Too Far
(November 21 & 22, 2011)
The Business Software Alliance (BSA) appears to be backing off from its
support of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which was introduced by
House Judiciary Committee chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas). In a recent
blog post, BSA President and CEO Robert Holleyman wrote that "Valid and
important questions have been raised about the bill," adding that it
could "sweep in more than just truly egregious actors."
http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valle ... rt-of-sopa
http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-57330 ... ight-bill/
[Editor's Note (Murray): Opposition to this obnoxious legislation is
growing but the smart money is still with the RIAA and the MPAA.]

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:06 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Senator Wyden Proposes Conversation About Alternative to PIPA
(December 2, 2011)
US Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon), is gathering legislators from across
the political spectrum to discuss alternatives to the draconian takedown
measures proposed by the Protect IP Act (PIPA). He has already promised
a filibuster if bill the should make it to the Senate Floor. PIPA bears
similarities to the House's Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), which has met
with a significant public outcry), Senator Wyden hopes to convince the
International Trade Commission, which already oversees issues of
material property, to expand its purview to include digital property as
well.
http://www.wired.com/threatlevel/2011/1 ... tive/all/1
http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/threa ... twyden.pdf

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:06 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Swiss Federal Council Downplays Filesharing Concerns
(December 5, 2011)
A report from Switzerland's Federal Council, compiled at the request of
the country's legislature, says that illegal filesharing is not a
significant problem. The report rejects three proposals aimed at
combating the issue: a three-strikes plan, similar to that codified in
France; Internet filtering; and a collective licensing plan that would
allow unlimited filesharing for a fee. The report says that consumers
still spend money on entertainment products, and that filesharing is a
concern only for "large foreign production companies," which need to
adapt their business models to include consumer behavior instead of
trying to push for legislation that seeks to maintain an outdated
system.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news ... ill-ok.ars
http://www.eweekeurope.co.uk/news/swiss ... egal-48351
[Editor's Note (Murray): Legislation is a blunt tool. It almost always
has unintended consequences. Nothing is so difficult to remedy as bad
legislation. Legislation should be used late, cautiously, and only
after all other measures have been tried. ]

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
 Post subject: Copyright legal issues in the news
PostPosted: Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:11 pm 
User avatar
I HATE MP3'S, RAPPERS AND CORPORATIONS!

Joined: 27 Sep 2006
Posts: 21752
Location: The Pasture
Sans wrote:
--Tech Industry Groups Speak Out Against SOPA
(December 7, 2011)
Technology industry groups have written letters to US legislative
leaders, asking them to reconsider the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA).
The letter, which is from the Consumer Electronics Association, the
Information Technology Industry Council, TechAmerica and others, warns
that passage of the bill as it stands will have unforeseen consequences
that could have a detrimental effect on the country's digital economy.
http://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valle ... -down-sopa

_________________
"Where soulless singers sang over beats built by machines" - Ani DiFranco


Top
  Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Go to page 1 ... 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 ... 42  ( Previous  |  Next )
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 908 posts ]   



Who is WANline

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  


Powdered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
Closed captioning provided by the spirit of Gardner Fox.

IMWAN is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide
a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com, amazon.ca and amazon.co.uk.